Current Studies

Research findings from the laboratory are used to improve our understanding of musculoskeletal and neuromuscular disorders, as well as develop new treatment approaches. To find more information on a particular research study, please view the outlines and general eligibility criteria below. If you are interested in taking part in a research study in the lab, please click the respective study links below.

1) Gait Modification Combined with Lateral Wedge Insoles for the Treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis

Participants Needed

Overview: A primary risk factor for the structural progression of knee osteoarthritis is excessive or abnormally distributed knee joint load during walking. This study will examine the combined effects of two conservative treatment strategies (lateral wedge insoles and gait modification) to redistribute loading of the knee joint. The gait modification training will be administered with and without the help of a smart shoe training aid providing vibration-based feedback during walking.

Objectives: To examine knee and ankle joint biomechanics when walking with a change in foot motion, a lateral wedge insole, or a combination of the two, and to examine the ease of teaching a change in foot motion using vibration-based feedback.

For more information about participating in this study and to register your interest, click here.

2) Beliefs about running footwear and research-based educational module

Participants Needed

Overview: Running is an accessible activity for people of all ages and a very popular sport around the world. However, running injury rates are high and despite a growing body of evidence about the effects of running shoes on injuries and biomechanics, there is a clear gap in research that identifies the perceptions in the population.

Objectives: This study aims to assess the perceptions of runners, shoe retailers, and healthcare professionals about running shoes. Additionally, we aim to evaluate the usefulness of an online educational module that summarizes the current research on running shoes.

For more information about participating in this study and to access the survey, click here.

3) Shoe-worn Orthotic Insole Treatment and Knee Osteoarthritis

Participants Needed

Overview: One form of conservative treatment for managing knee osteoarthritis is to modify knee joint loading with lateral wedge insoles. However, the change in knee joint loads while wearing lateral wedge insoles can vary between people due to individual differences in foot and lower limb alignment. Quantifying these differences in individual characteristics may help with predicting which people with knee osteoarthritis may be best suited for this type of treatment. Moreover, little is known about how the knee joint interface changes with lateral wedge insole use.

Objectives: To identify predictors of change in knee joint loads while walking and to assess how the knee joint interface changes with lateral wedge insole wear in individuals with knee osteoarthritis.

For more information about participating in this study and to register your interest, click here.

4) Running Mechanics in Runners with and without Knee Osteoarthritis Females neededParticipants Needed

Overview: Previous research has identified differences in lower limb biomechanics in runners with knee pain when compared to healthy controls. In addition, footwear has been shown to influence knee loading during running in young healthy individuals. Gait retraining interventions aiming to reduce knee forces during running may be useful to runners with knee osteoarthritis. Altogether, there is room to expand current understanding of these factors to build a solid base for future intervention studies.

Objectives: 1) To compare lower limb biomechanics of runners with and without knee osteoarthritis to identify differences that could be targeted by clinicians when treating runners with tibiofemoral osteoarthritis (TFOA) or arthritis in the two main weight bearing bones of the knee joint; 2) To evaluate the effects of running barefoot and with different shoes on lower limb biomechanics (kinetics, kinematics) in runners with and without knee osteoarthritis; 3) To evaluate the effects of a 4-week gait retraining intervention on symptoms, function and running biomechanics of runners with knee osteoarthritis.

For more information about participating in this study and to register your interest, click here.